Plenary Sessions of WMSCI 2013 Conference

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Pre-Conference Workshop on Interdisciplinary Research, Education, and Communication through Case Studies and Methodologies

Dr. T. Grandon Gill

Full text of the associated invited paper in PDF at http://www.iiisci.org/journal/sci/FullText.asp?var=&id=iSA374GZ

Abstract

Abstract: Research can be characterized as an ongoing battle to understand the intrinsic complexity of the universe. For the past several hundred years, we have relied on two things to aid us in our skirmishes. The first is luck; sometimes it turns out that simple laws govern previously-mysterious behaviors, such as the motion of the planets or the relationship between electricity and magnetism. The second is increasing specialization; choosing problems and contexts sufficiently narrow so that they may prove solvable.

Although many academic researchers continue to hold out the possibility that the string of luck that has blessed our understanding of the physical sciences will continue with sufficient study, it is becoming increasingly evident that there are whole classes of problems whose intrinsic complexity will forever defy simple solutions. These problems are often important problems, problems involving social and technological systems that truly matter to people. The challenge presented by many of these systems is this: by decomposing them into component parts, we lose sight of the overall properties that are important to us.

A particularly common situation where complexity appears to evade the researcher’s ability to specialize occurs when multiple disciplines come into play. For example, a technology product (engineering) is introduced into the workforce (business) but is rejected by workers (psychology), a drug (chemistry) is employed to treat a condition (medicine) but elicits very different responses among patients (genetics?), an economic model (economics) is used as a basis for a policy (government) but leads to unexpected behaviors from certain groups (sociology), and so forth. For problems such as these, the challenge seems to be one of identifying better or best combinations, rather focusing on individual elements in isolation.

The case study provides an approach that can be applied to such problems. Cases are highly versatile, being equally well suited for research, for use in the classroom and for engaging research with practice. In addition, the types of situations where case studies are most appropriate tend to be precisely those complex situations where disciplines overlap. Thus, there are few research methodologies and teaching strategies that are more supportive of an interdisciplinary approach than the case method.

The workshop on interdisciplinary research, education and communication through case studies and methodologies will cover the following topics:

  • The nature of complexity and the obstacles it presents
  • Different types of case study: a taxonomy
  • Cases in the classroom
  • Interdisciplinary case research
  • Case studies and practice
  • Case writing
  • The integrative view

The “integrative view” of case studies considers their use as a tool for linking together students, research and practice. Beyond that, they can be used to achieve understanding within diverse groups of: students (e.g., with different backgrounds), practitioners (e.g., businesses, labor, government) and researchers (e.g., from different disciplines). Following the presentation, participants will join in a discussion of case studies and alternative means of bringing disciplines together to better serve the needs of a complex world.

Short Bio

The facilitator, Dr. T. Grandon Gill, Professor at the University of South Florida, USA, has extensive experience in case method research, as well as in writing cases for classroom use and facilitating case discussions. His MBA and DBA are both from Harvard Business School, where the case method originated. He is author of the book Informing with the Case Method (2011, Informing Science Press) and recently became the founding editor of Journal of Information Technology Education: Discussion Cases, a publication outlet for case studies in the MIS, IT and informing science fields. Interested participants will be encouraged to remain in touch with the facilitator for possible participation in future grant initiatives and workshops.

Systemics and Requirements: A Missing Dimension?

Dr. Thomas Marlowe

Full text of the associated invited paper in PDF at http://www.iiisci.org/journal/sci/FullText.asp?var=&id=iSA924MS

Abstract

A repeated theme of past keynotes here has been an emphasis on the interaction of the problem and the analyzer. While there are clear benefits of this systemic view of second-order science, problem-solving and critical thinking, there is a tacit assumption that the analyzer and the poser of the problem are identical, or at least share a context and a conceptual framework.

But this may not be the case. Increasingly, it does not pertain in business and engineering ventures, software development, pedagogy, and even research projects. We briefly (and somewhat whimsically) look at the role of knowledge transfer and requirements analysis in the more general case where the poser (client) and the analyzer (researcher/developer) differ, and the further situation in which the user of the solution may differ from either.

Short Bio

Professor Thomas J. Marlowe is Program Advisor for Computer Science, has been a member of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Seton Hall University for over 30 years, and have taught a wide variety of courses in both disciplines. Professor Marlowe enjoys working with students and with professional colleagues– almost all his research is collaborative. His professional interests include in mathematics, abstract algebra and discrete mathematics; in computer science, programming languages, real-time systems, and software engineering, and in information science, collaboration and knowledge management. The connection between graphs and algebraic structures is a recurrent theme.

Professor Marlowe has Ph.D. in Computer Science, from Rutgers, The State University, and a Ph.D. in Mathematics from Rutgers, The State University. Professor Marlowe has many Publications and Academic Distinctions. He has over 70 publications in refereed conferences and journals in mathematics, computer science and information science. Some of the more recent and more significant include:

  • T.J. Marlowe, N. Jastroch, V. Kirova, M. Mohtashami, “A Classification of Collaborative Knowledge,” Special Session on Collaborative Knowledge Management, Workshop on Knowledge Generation, Communication and Management (KGCM 2010), to appear, June 2010.
  • T. J. Marlowe, V. Kirova, “High-level Component Interfaces for Collaborative Development: A Proposal”, Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics, and Informatics, 7 (6), pages 1-6, 2009.
  • Rountev, S. Kagan, T. J. Marlowe, “Interprocedural Dataflow Analysis in the Presence of Large Libraries”, Proceedings of CC 2006, 216, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 3923, 2006.
  • S. P. Masticola, T. J. Marlowe, B. G. Ryder, “Multisource Data Flow Problems”, ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems, 17 (5), 777 -803, September 1995.
  • D. Stoyenko, T. J. Marlowe, “Polynomial-Time Program Transformations and Schedulability Analysis of Parallel Real-time Programs with Restricted Resource Contention”, Journal of Real-Time Systems, 4 (4), 1992.
  • T. J. Marlowe, B. G. Ryder, “Properties of data flow frameworks: A unified model”, Acta Informatica, 28 (2), 121 -164, 1991.

Professor Marlowe is member of more than 10 Ph. D. thesis and 5 M.S. thesis committees, member of more than 20 conference program committees, and reviewer for numerous conferences, journals, and grants. He is the founder of an ongoing professional conference, and co-founder of a new workshop on collaboration.

Circularity, Topology and Cybernetics: Second Order Science

Dr. Louis H. Kauffman

Abstract

Cybernetics has, from its very beginnings been concerned with circularity – the circularity of feedback in biological, social, scientific and mathematical systems, the fundamental circularities behind our forms of explanation and the ever-present circularity of thought and understanding acting on itself. At a certain key point, Margaret Mead spoke of the cybernetics of cybernetics and this was taken up as a call for a second-order cybernetics by Heinz von Foerster and eventually many others. The understanding behind so-called second-order cybernetics is inherent in cybernetics itself. Along with considering a self-conscious cybernetics that includes the observer, we make the shift to a fully embodied scientific view. In this view one cannot avoid seeing the participation of the scientist as part of the science itself. This is nowhere more clear than in the biology of cognition, where a theory of cognition must wrap around and explain itself, or in economic practice where the theories of action are embodied in the participants in the economy and these participants form that economy. But this is also the case in all scientific endeavor once one is quite precise about the role of thought and concept in the practice of that science. There are no objects of study that are not combinations of percept and concept. Each place where we contact experience meaningfully is an amalagam of appropriate concept and the accuracy of perception.

All objects come along with a perception, a conception and an awareness. We make generalizations and theories but each act of understanding is founded in the circularity of percept and concept and thought acting upon itself. Second-order science includes its practitioners and must be fully accurate in that accounting.

The consequences of this point of view go across the board, taking the axis of second-order cybernetics fully to a coordination of all forms of knowledge. This talk will discuss these issues of second order science in the context of topological models. Such models are an invaluable aid in sharpening the understanding of these issues of circularity and knowledge.

Short Bio

Professor Kauffman was the President of the American Society for Cybernetics (2005-2008). He is the 1993 recipient of the Warren McCulloch award of the American Society for Cybernetics and the 1996 recipient of the award of the Alternative Natural Philosophy Association for his work on discrete physics. He is the founding editor and editor in chief of the Journal of Knot Theory and its Ramifications, and editor of the World Scientific Book Series on Knots and Everything. He writes a column entitled Virtual Logic for the journal Cybernetics and Human Knowing. His interests are in cybernetics, topology (knot theory and its ramifications) and foundations of mathematics and physics. His work is primarily in knot theory and connections with statistical mechanics, quantum theory, algebra, combinatorics and foundations. This work is founded in understanding the nature of the distinctions that generate these structures.

He has worked at many places as a visiting professor and researcher, including the University of Zaragoza in Spain, the University of Iowa in Iowa City, the Institute Hautes Etudes Scientifiques in Bures Sur Yevette, France, the Institute Henri Poincaré in Paris, France, the Univesidad de Pernambuco in Recife, Brasil, and the Newton Institute in Cambridge England.

Professor Kauffman is a prominent worker in Knot Theory, one of the most active research areas in mathematics today. His discoveries include a state sum model for the Alexander-Conway Polynomial, the bracket state sum model for the Jones polynomial, the Kauffman polynomial and the theory of virtual knots and links.

He is author of several monographs on knot theory and mathematical physics. His publication list numbers over 170. Among his books are the followings:

  • 1987, On Knots, Princeton University Press 498 pp.
  • 1993, Quantum Topology (Series on Knots & Everything), with Randy A.
  • Baadhio, World Scientific Pub Co Inc, 394 pp.
  • 1994, Temperley-Lieb Recoupling Theory and Invariants of 3-Manifolds, with Sostenes Lins, Princeton University Press, 312 pp.
  • 1995, Knots and Applications (Series on Knots and Everything, Vol 6) 1995, The Interface of Knots and Physics: American Mathematical Society Short Course January 2-3, 1995 San Francisco, California (Proceedings of Symposia in Applied Mathematics), with the American Mathematical Society.
  • 1998, Knots at Hellas 98: Proceedings of the International Conference on Knot Theory and Its Ramifications, with Cameron Gordon, Vaughan F. R. Jones and Sofia Lambropoulou, 1999, Ideal Knots, with Andrzej Stasiak and Vsevolod Katritch, World Scientific Publishing Company, 414 pp.
  • 2002, Hypercomplex Iterations: Distance Estimation and Higher Dimensional Fractals (Series on Knots and Everything , Vol 17), with Yumei Dang and Daniel Sandin.
  • 2006, Formal Knot Theory, Dover Publications, 272 pp.
  • (First published by Princeton University Press in 1983) 2007, Intelligence of Low Dimensional Topology 2006, with J. Scott Carter and Seiichi Kamada.
  • 2012, Knots and Physics (Series on Knots and Everything, Vol. 1- Fourth Edition 2012, First Published in 1991), World Scientific Publishing Company, 788 pp.
  • 2013, The Mereon Matrix – Unity, Perspective and Paradox, ed by Lynnclairce Dennis, Jytte Bender McNair and Louis H. Kauffman, Elsevier Pub. Co

(http://homepages.math.uic.edu/~kauffman/)

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_H._Kauffman)

(http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLiK4NNHYj1YGOK5IqS_Dlp52ICsvR8BWV)

http://youtu.be/y9k3tYBREj0

Expansion of Science

Dr. Stuart Umpleby

Abstract

In the years after World War II the field of cybernetics and several variations of systems science were created.  These fields added several dimensions to scientific investigations:  from linear to circular causality, from direction to self-organization, from reductionism to holism, from environment free to environment full investigations, and from not including the observer to including the observer.  Hence the systems sciences expanded the subjects of scientific investigations on several dimensions.  These dimensions, identified by Eric Dent, define the systems sciences relative to earlier disciplines.  They also explain why systems science has had difficulty coming together as a unified field, since different groups within systems science have emphasized different combinations of the dimensions.

We now seem to be witnessing a second expansion of science.  Whereas physics provides a theory of matter and energy relationships, the goal of cybernetics was to create a common language of control and communication, or of information and regulation, to aid research among social scientists, those working on information machines, and those working in the fields of design.  The current interest in reflexivity is helping to create this second expansion of science which emphasizes that theories in the social sciences have an effect on the phenomena being studied.  Apparently we now need to describe a “second order science” which describes the effects of first order theories (and second order theories as well) on the phenomena of interest.

Short Bio

Stuart Umpleby is a professor in the Department of Management and Director of the Research Program in Social and Organizational Learning in the School of Business at The George Washington University. He received degrees in engineering, political science, and communications from the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. From 1975 to the present he has been a professor at The George Washington University. From 1994 to 1997 he was the faculty facilitator of the Quality and Innovation Initiative in the GW School of Business and Public Management. From 1997 to 2000 he worked on the Year 2000 Computer Crisis, viewing it as an opportunity to test social science theories using a before and after research design. He teaches courses in the philosophy of science, cross-cultural management, organizational behavior, cybernetics, and systems science. Other interests include process improvement methods, group facilitation methods, and the use of computer networks.

Umpleby has published articles in Science, Policy Sciences, Population and Environment, Science Communication, The Futurist, Futures, World Futures, The Journal of Aesthetic Education, Simulation and Games, Business and Society Review, Journal of International Business and Economics, Review of Business Research, Telecommunications Policy, Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences,  Reflexive Control, Systems Practice, Kybernetes, Cybernetics and Human Knowing, Cybernetics and Systems and several foreign language journals. He is a past president of the American Society for Cybernetics. He is Associate Editor of the journal Cybernetics and Systems.

Umpleby has received research grants from the National Science Foundation, the Charles F. Kettering Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the Nathan Cummings Foundation, the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and the Central Asia Research Initiative. He has consulted with the World Bank, with government agencies in the U.S. and Canada and with corporations in the U.S., Europe, Japan, and China. He has advised on the creation of a PhD program in management and business in Almaty, Kazakhstan. In May 2008 he conducted a video conference on “How to do Research” with Uzbek scholars at the U.S. Embassy in Tashkent.

In connection with his work in systems theory and management, he has been a guest scholar at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg, Austria, the University of Vienna, the Institute for Advanced Studies in Vienna, Austria, and the University of St. Gallen in St. Gallen, Switzerland. He is a member of the Principia Cybernetica Project at the Free University of Brussels. In spring 2004 he was a Fulbright Scholar in the School of Economics and Business, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina.

Between 1981 and 1988 Umpleby was the American coordinator of a series of meetings between American and Russian scientists to discuss the foundations of cybernetics and systems theory. These meetings were supported by the Russian Academy of Sciences and the International Research and Exchanges Board of the American Council of Learned Societies. His interest in the transitions in the post-communist countries has resulted in his presenting lectures at various institutes of the Academies of Science of Russia, Ukraine, Poland, Hungary, and Bulgaria.He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society for Cybernetics, the Austrian Society for Cybernetic Studies, the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics, and the International Society for the Systems Sciences.

Academic Writing for Inter-Disciplinary Communication

Dr. Denise K. Comer

Full text of the associated invited paper in PDF at http://www.iiisci.org/journal/sci/FullText.asp?var=&id=iEA953FD

Abstract

As institutions of higher learning make growing numbers of interdisciplinary faculty hires, establish ever more interdisciplinary units, develop interdisciplinary curricula, and pursue growth sectors such as global and online education, the ability to write effectively across disciplinary boundaries is becoming ever more vital, and ever more complex. The rapidly changing and expanding academic climate lends urgency for students, faculty, staff, and administrators not only to learn how to communicate across disciplines, but also to reflect meaningfully on why they might want to do so. Drawing on David Russell’s activity theory and other scholarship on writing transfer, this keynote address will focus on strategies for and benefits of interdisciplinary communication through writing. During the keynote, Comer will sponsor and facilitate audience participation, thereby enacting interdisciplinary conversation among participants so we can together raise questions and think more deeply about shared and distinct values, expectations, and conventions of writing across disciplines.

Short bio

Denise Comer, Assistant Professor of the Practice of Writing Studies and Director of First-Year Writing at Duke University, has worked for over fifteen years with writing faculty who hold Ph.D.s from across the social sciences, natural sciences, and humanities. Duke University’s award-winning and nationally recognized Thompson Writing Program (TWP) is founded on the premise that cross-disciplinary conversations about writing improve the teaching of writing and help students learn how to more effectively navigate the varying landscape of academic writing. This shared endeavor of approaching the teaching of first-year writing as an intellectual endeavor based in disciplinary and interdisciplinary inquiry have helped earn the TWP national recognition with the 2006 CCCC Writing Program Certificate of Excellence and the 2012 U.S. News & World Report, which commended Duke for “making the writing process a priority at all levels of instruction and across the curriculum.” Comer’s scholarship, which has been published in leading journals, explores writing theory and pedagogy. She has two books forthcoming in 2014 from Fountainhead Press: It’s Just a Dissertation: Transforming Your Dissertation from Daunting to Doable to Done (co-authored with Barbara Gina Garrett), and Writing in Transit. An Anthology with Readings from the Disciplines.

Plenary Workshop on Circularity, Topology and Cybernetics: Second Order Science

Dr. Louis H. Kauffman

Abstract

Cybernetics has, from its very beginnings been concerned with circularity – the circularity of feedback in biological, social, scientific and mathematical systems, the fundamental circularities behind our forms of explanation and the ever-present circularity of thought and understanding acting on itself. At a certain key point, Margaret Mead spoke of the cybernetics of cybernetics and this was taken up as a call for a second-order cybernetics by Heinz von Foerster and eventually many others. The understanding behind so-called second-order cybernetics is inherent in cybernetics itself. Along with considering a self-conscious cybernetics that includes the observer, we make the shift to a fully embodied scientific view. In this view one cannot avoid seeing the participation of the scientist as part of the science itself. This is nowhere more clear than in the biology of cognition, where a theory of cognition must wrap around and explain itself, or in economic practice where the theories of action are embodied in the participants in the economy and these participants form that economy. But this is also the case in all scientific endeavor once one is quite precise about the role of thought and concept in the practice of that science. There are no objects of study that are not combinations of percept and concept. Each place where we contact experience meaningfully is an amalagam of appropriate concept and the accuracy of perception.

All objects come along with a perception, a conception and an awareness. We make generalizations and theories but each act of understanding is founded in the circularity of percept and concept and thought acting upon itself. Second-order science includes its practitioners and must be fully accurate in that accounting. The consequences of this point of view go across the board, taking the axis of second-order cybernetics fully to a coordination of all forms of knowledge. This talk will discuss these issues of second order science in the context of topological models. Such models are an invaluable aid in sharpening the understanding of these issues of circularity and knowledge.

This workshop will discuss these issues of second order science in the context of topological models. Such models are an invaluable aid in sharpening the understanding of these issues of circularity and knowledge. In the workshop we will work directly with topological models such as planar curves, knots, surfaces, fractals and recursive forms. This direct geometric work allows us to examine just how objects arise, now concept and perception are related and how the individual participates in the unfolding of these relationships.

Short Bio

Professor Kauffman was the President of the American Society for Cybernetics (2005-2008). He is the 1993 recipient of the Warren McCulloch award of the American Society for Cybernetics and the 1996 recipient of the award of the Alternative Natural Philosophy Association for his work on discrete physics. He is the founding editor and editor in chief of the Journal of Knot Theory and its Ramifications, and editor of the World Scientific Book Series on Knots and Everything. He writes a column entitled Virtual Logic for the journal Cybernetics and Human Knowing. His interests are in cybernetics, topology (knot theory and its ramifications) and foundations of mathematics and physics. His work is primarily in knot theory and connections with statistical mechanics, quantum theory, algebra, combinatorics and foundations. This work is founded in understanding the nature of the distinctions that generate these structures.

He has worked at many places as a visiting professor and researcher, including the University of Zaragoza in Spain, the University of Iowa in Iowa City, the Institute Hautes Etudes Scientifiques in Bures Sur Yevette, France, the Institute Henri Poincaré in Paris, France, the Univesidad de Pernambuco in Recife, Brasil, and the Newton Institute in Cambridge England.

Professor Kauffman is a prominent worker in Knot Theory, one of the most active research areas in mathematics today. His discoveries include a state sum model for the Alexander-Conway Polynomial, the bracket state sum model for the Jones polynomial, the Kauffman polynomial and the theory of virtual knots and links.

He is author of several monographs on knot theory and mathematical physics. His publication list numbers over 170. Among his books are the followings:

  • 1987, On Knots, Princeton University Press 498 pp.
  • 1993, Quantum Topology (Series on Knots & Everything), with Randy A.
  • Baadhio, World Scientific Pub Co Inc, 394 pp.
  • 1994, Temperley-Lieb Recoupling Theory and Invariants of 3-Manifolds, with Sostenes Lins, Princeton University Press, 312 pp.
  • 1995, Knots and Applications (Series on Knots and Everything, Vol 6) 1995, The Interface of Knots and Physics: American Mathematical Society Short Course January 2-3, 1995 San Francisco, California (Proceedings of Symposia in Applied Mathematics), with the American Mathematical Society.
  • 1998, Knots at Hellas 98: Proceedings of the International Conference on Knot Theory and Its Ramifications, with Cameron Gordon, Vaughan F. R. Jones and Sofia Lambropoulou, 1999, Ideal Knots, with Andrzej Stasiak and Vsevolod Katritch, World Scientific Publishing Company, 414 pp.
  • 2002, Hypercomplex Iterations: Distance Estimation and Higher Dimensional Fractals (Series on Knots and Everything , Vol 17), with Yumei Dang and Daniel Sandin.
  • 2006, Formal Knot Theory, Dover Publications, 272 pp.
  • (First published by Princeton University Press in 1983) 2007, Intelligence of Low Dimensional Topology 2006, with J. Scott Carter and Seiichi Kamada.
  • 2012, Knots and Physics (Series on Knots and Everything, Vol. 1- Fourth Edition 2012, First Published in 1991), World Scientific Publishing Company, 788 pp.
  • 2013, The Mereon Matrix – Unity, Perspective and Paradox, ed by Lynnclairce Dennis, Jytte Bender McNair and Louis H. Kauffman, Elsevier Pub. Co.

(http://homepages.math.uic.edu/~kauffman/)

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_H._Kauffman)

(http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLiK4NNHYj1YGOK5IqS_Dlp52ICsvR8BWV)

An interdisciplinary area of research offers the tool of cross-cultural understanding: cross-cultural student seminar for communication training on biomedical engineering

Dr. Shigehiro Hashimoto

Full text of the associated invited paper in PDF at http://www.iiisci.org/journal/sci/FullText.asp?var=&id=iGA401OY

Abstract

Misunderstanding often occurs in multidisciplinary field of study, because each field has its own background of thinking.  Communication training is important for students, who have a potential to develop multidisciplinary field of study.  Because each nation has its own cultural background, communication in an international seminar is not easy, either.  A cross-cultural student seminar has been designed for communication training in multidisciplinary field of study.  Students from variety of back ground have joined in the seminar.  Equations and figures are effective tools for communication in the field of science.

The seminar works well for communication training in the multidisciplinary field of study of biomedical engineering.  The presentation refers to author’s several experiences: the student internship abroad, the cross cultural student camp, various PhD theses, various affiliations, and creating the interdisciplinary department.

Short Bio

Professor Shigehiro Hashimoto is Doctor of Medicine from Kitasato University in 1987, and Doctor of Engineering from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1990. He is the current Associate to the President and Dean of Admissions Center of the Kogakuin University (Japan).

Professor Hashimoto was Research. Associate at the School of Medicine, Kitasato University, (1981-1989), Asst. Prof. in the School of Medicine, Kitasato University (1989-1994), Assoc. Prof. Osaka Institute of Technology (1994-2001), and Professor at Osaka Institute of Technology (2001-2011). He also was professor and Chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Osaka Institute of Technology (2005) and Director of its Medical Engineering Research Center (2005-2011)

Professor Hashimoto held internship in Research Center for Artificial Heart in Free University in Berlin, Germany in 1977.

He is Doctor of Medicine from Kitasato University, Japan, in 1987, and Doctor of Engineering from Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, in 1990

He was Assistant Professor, in Bioengineering, in the School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Japan, 1989-1994.

He was Professor in the Department of Electronics, Osaka Institute of Technology, Japan, 2001-2004

Professor Hashimoto was the Department Creator of Biomedical Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, Japan, 2005; and Director of Medical Engineering Research Center, Osaka Institute of Technology, Japan, 2005-2011.

Professor Hashimoto is in the present:

  • Professor of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kogakuin University, Japan, 2011-.
  • Associate to the President, Kogakuin University, Japan, 2012-.
  • Dean of Admissions Center, Kogakuin University, Japan, 2012-.

Musical Emotions: Cognitive function and evolution: A mathematical-psychological theory and experimental evidence

Dr. Leonid Perlovsky

Full text of the associated invited paper in PDF at http://www.iiisci.org/journal/sci/FullText.asp?var=&id=iCK872YO

Abstract

Why music has such a power over us, why has it evolved in evolution? Does music have a fundamental cognitive function? 2400 years ago Aristotle asked: “Why music being just sounds reminds states of soul?” He asked this question alongside with “is the world finite?” and “does God exist?” Kant could not answer this question. Darwin thought that “music… is a greatest mystery.” And today evolutionary psychologists cannot agree on answers to these questions.

Based on mathematical-psychological ideas about cognition, I discuss a hypothesis that music has a fundamental cognitive function. This function is to unify mental mechanisms of the mind. Whereas animals have a unified mechanism of concept-emotion-behavior-vocalization, humans have differentiated function for each of these. We can independently think, talk, feel, about different things. This gives us freedom of deliberate thinking. But we have to pay for this freedom: our thoughts and actions are not automatically connected to our instinctual needs. Our mental life is not necessarily whole. It is not easy for us to maintain a clear view of the meaning and purpose of our life.

This is manifest in a well established psychological theory of Cognitive Dissonance, CD. CD is a psychological conflict when holding contradictory cognitions. Whereas scientists and engineers thrive on solving contradictions, most of people cannot stand them, and usually discard contradictory knowledge, even if irrationally. Ancient Greeks knew this: in Aesop fable the Fox sees high-hanging Grape, which he cannot get. This creates CD: he wants grape, but cannot get it. The Fox resolves the dissonance: The “Grape is sour.”

During the last 50 years thousands of experiments with children and adults repeated similar experiments. It is well known, people discard contradictory knowledge. But then, how could knowledge accumulate? How could human culture evolve?

I will tell about several experiments performed by my colleagues: if music plays in the background, people do not have to discard knowledge. Music helps to unify contradictory cognitions. Bach music helps unifying most difficult contradictions: between life and death, between striving for happiness and life despairs. Rap and Lady Gaga help to unify simple everyday ideas (about girls, boys, police…). Our mental life is split into pieces by our ability for language and thinking. Music unifies our soul. This is the reason it emerged in evolution, this is the reason it has such a power over us.

Short Bio

Dr. Leonid Perlovsky is Visiting Scholar at Harvard University, Technical Advisor and Principal Research Physicist at the Air Force Research Laboratory. His research interests include computational intelligence and neural networks; mathematical modeling of the mind and brain including higher cognitive functions, consciousness, emotions; abilities for beautiful, sublime, music; evolution of languages, cognition and cultures. He serves as Program Manager for DOD Semantic Web program and for several research projects. From 1985 to 1999 Chief Scientist at Nichols Research, a $0.5 B high-tech organization, leading the corporate research in intelligent systems, neural networks, sensor fusion, and data mining; previously, Professor at Novosibirsk University and New York University. He participated as a principal in commercial startups developing tools for natural language text understanding, biotechnology, and financial predictions. His financial company predicted the market crash following 9/11 a week before the event, apparently detecting illegal Al Qaeda trades, and later helped SEC tracking the perpetrators. Dr. Perlovsky delivered invited keynote and plenary talks, tutorial lectures at conferences and Universities worldwide; published about 60 papers in refereed scientific journals, 250 papers in conferences, authored 10 book chapters and three books, “Neural Networks and Intellect,” Oxford University Press 2001 (currently in the 3rd printing); “Neurodynamics of Higher-Level Cognition and Consciousness” (co-author R. Kozma), Springer 2007’ “Sapient Systems” (co-author R. Mayorga), Springer 2007. He leads an IEEE NNTC Task Force on The Mind and Brain, serves as Chair IEEE Boston Computational Intelligence Chapter, on several IEEE Committees, Organizing Committees for WCCI’06, IJCNN’07, Program Co-Chair for IJCNN’09, Program and General Chair for several IEEE conferences, Assistant Editor for “Transactions on Neural Networks,” Editor-at-large for “Natural Computations,” Editor-in-Chief for “Physics of Life Reviews.” He is interviewed on Radio and TV about workings of the human mind. Dr. Perlovsky received prestigious National and International awards, including several Best Paper awards, IEEE Distinguished Member Award, Boston Section 2005; Dr. Charles E. Ryan Memorial Award for outstanding in-house scientific efforts and achievement 2007, Air Force Research Laboratory; International Neural Network Society Gabor Award, 2007; McLucas Award 2007 (the top scientific US Air Force award).

A Biometric for Neurobiology of Influence with Social Informatics Using Game Theory

Dr. Mark Donald Rahmes

Full text of the associated invited paper in PDF at http://www.iiisci.org/journal/sci/FullText.asp?var=&id=iSA679LZ

Abstract

This plenary keynote address is constructed on the premise that human belief dependent emotions can be triggered by story-telling or narratives. With recent technological advancements to measure neurobiological measurements of the brain, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and non-invasive brain computing interface (BCI) equipment, these technologies can allow for visualization and data collection of brain activation patterns showing unconsciously controlled responses to narratives or stories. Current game theory application to belief networks has been modeled to help explain observed behavior when material payoffs of others matters to the individual.  We discuss a method of how game theory, utilizing communication packet theory, can now be modeled to belief dependent emotions and intentions measured through a new biometric tool correlating neurobiological emotional states and responses.

Short Bio

Mark has 20 years of experience at Harris Corporation as an Electrical/Computer Engineer and Research Scientist. He earned his BSEE from The Citadel, MSEE from Duke University and PhD in Operations Research from Florida Tech. Mark is a retired U.S. Navy Reserve Captain and served 22 years as a Commanding Officer, Engineering Duty Officer and Surface Warfare Officer. He currently has 37 patents granted. Mark has published 26 conference papers. At Harris Corporation, Mark serves in the capacity of a Principal Investigator, Chief Software Engineer, and Research Scientist on various programs while advancing image processing research and development. Mark is a member of Tau Beta Pi and Phi Kappa Phi National Honor Societies.

Action Learning: Doing in order to think – Thinking in order to do

Dr. Andreas Ninck

Full text of the associated invited paper in PDF at http://www.iiisci.org/journal/sci/FullText.asp?var=&id=iGA663UP

Abstract

Briefly described, action learning is a remarkably simple approach that involves a group of people working on real problems and learning while they do so. But action learning is more than simply ‘learning by doing’. In a world of increasing complexity, taking action alone will not result in a learning effect per se. Based on our experience with MscBA students working on real challenges with companies like UBS, Swisscom, Swiss Post, or Swiss Federal Railways we are giving an overview of some key principles and practices. And we are presenting the results of an evaluation which gives evidence that action learning is especially helpful when it comes to dealing with complexity. Problem-solvers and innovators will need increasingly the ability to break through existing mindsets and to collectively generate new knowledge. Systems thinking, self-organized actions, constructive learning, and the perpetual formation of new knowledge are vital competencies for innovation as well as for the success of individuals and organizations. As a matter of fact the ability to learn more quickly than competitors provides a decisive and lasting competitive advantage in any given situation.

Short Bio

Dr. Andreas Ninck is a professor in business development at the Berne University of Applied Sciences, Switzerland. He lectures on the subjects of business analysis & design, systems thinking & problem solving, knowledge & innovation management, and project management. As well, Dr. Ninck is leading a number of R&D projects. His main interests are in design thinking, knowledge management, collaborative engineering, and e-learning.